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FAQS

Breaking up with smoking is a process that’s totally unique to you. Here’s some answers to common questions to help you on your way.

  • Icons of a lozenge, person with a lozenge in their cheek, and a clock

    Suck one piece

    Rest between cheek and gums

    Repeat for 30 minutes

    To use THRIVE Lozenges, read the instructions in the box and follow these four simple steps:

    1. Suck the lozenge until you begin to taste a strong nicotine flavour.
    2. Rest the lozenge between your cheek and gums and keep it there until the taste fades.
    3. Start sucking again until a strong taste is noticed.
    4. Repeat the process for about 30 minutes, which should be long enough for the lozenge to dissolve completely.

    Taking breaks between sucking is essential. If more nicotine is released than your mouth is able to absorb, you’ll end up swallowing it and won’t feel the effects.

  • Light smokers (less than a pack a day) should use 1 mg lozenges.

    Heavy smokers (one pack or more a day) are recommended to use 2 mg lozenges.

  • Icons of a piece of gum, person with a piece of gum in their cheek, and a clock

    Chew one piece

    Rest between cheeks and gums

    Repeat chewing routine for about 30 minutes.

    To use THRIVE Gum read the instructions in the box and follow these four simple steps:

    1. Keep chewing the gum until you taste a strong nicotine flavour.
    2. Rest the gum between your cheek and gums and keep it there until the taste fades.
    3. Start chewing the gum again until you notice a strong taste.
    4. Repeat this chewing routine for approximately 30 minutes.

    Taking breaks between chewing is essential. If more nicotine is released than your mouth is able to absorb, you’ll end up swallowing it and not feeling the effects.

  • Light smokers (less than a pack a day) should use 2 mg of gum.

    Heavy smokers (one pack a day or more) should use 4 mg of gum.

  • There are millions of people who successfully give up smoking every year and we know you can be one of them. Everyone’s journey is different. Whatever route you choose to take, nicotine replacement can help.

    THRIVE nicotine gum and nicotine lozenges are convenient and discreet solutions that release nicotine to help manage your cravings.

    It’s also a great idea to prepare in advance for your smoke-free life. Form a smoking support group and remove smoking temptations from places like your home and car. 

  • Tough call. You should take a lot of time to consider the decision to go cold turkey.

    A lot of people underestimate how hard it is to resist cravings using willpower alone, as nicotine in cigarettes is very addictive. Nicotine replacement therapy delivers a controlled amount of nicotine to your system to help soothe your physical cravings, so you can focus on the mental aspects of cutting back.

    There are many varieties of nicotine replacement therapy available to you too. THRIVE nicotine gum and nicotine lozenges are discreet and convenient options which can help you get through your cravings.

  • Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) is designed to help you cut back. It also doesn’t contain any of the cancer-causing agents found in cigarettes. NRT helps you wean off of nicotine until you do not need it anymore.

    The best part? Using nicotine replacement therapy as directed doubles your chances of quitting.*

    THRIVE nicotine replacement therapy comes in both nicotine lozenges and nicotine gum. Both are discreet options that are easy to reach for when a craving hits.

    *Doubles your chances of quitting vs placebo. Use as directed. Behavioral support program increases chances of success. Many people require several quit attempts to stop smoking. Products are part of an 8–12-week program.

  • There can be side effects from taking nicotine replacement products such as THRIVE.

    General side effects of nicotine replacement products include vivid dreams, due to a low, therapeutic dose of nicotine being the active ingredient in nicotine replacement products, headaches, nausea and other digestive problems.

    If you choose to use nicotine lozenges, side effects to look out for are hiccups, excessive gas or an upset stomach — the latter is particularly common if you swallow the lozenge.

    Side effects that may be experienced from using nicotine gum include a tingling feeling on the tongue while the gum is being chewed, as well as jaw pain as a result of chewing. It is recommended that you do not choose gum if you have problems with the jaw joint — this could include temporomandibular joint (TMJ) syndrome.

    Be sure to carefully read the user guide inside the box for a complete list of possible side effects.

  • In the first few weeks after an abrupt decrease or discontinuation in the intake of nicotine, a group of symptoms collectively known as nicotine withdrawal will develop.

    A series of neurotransmitters are released into your brain through smoking when you are nicotine dependent, with dopamine being one of these. It is dopamine that gives you that relaxed and satisfied feeling when you light up. Nicotine’s effects on the brain also includes reducing irritability and reducing appetite.

    When ending your dependency on nicotine — even as soon as 30 minutes after your last use of tobacco — you may feel withdrawal symptoms. These will vary on your level of addiction but can include all of the following:

    An intense craving for nicotine

    Anxiety

    Coughing and a possible sore throat

    Depression

    Finding it hard to concentrate

    Headaches

    Insomnia

    Intestinal cramping

    Irritability

    Nausea

    Sweating

    A tingling feeling in the hands and feet

    Weight gain

    It can be tough when these withdrawal symptoms strike, but know that it’s your body’s way of getting back to a healthy way of functioning. Hang in there. Stick with it. It will get better as your journey progresses.

  • When a craving hits, remember it should pass in just a few short minutes. When a craving does come, think about your reason for stopping. If it’s a loved one, keep a photo handy. Looking to save money? Keep track of how much additional money you’re making by choosing not to smoke and then look at the savings anytime you get a craving for a cigarette.

    Exercise is another great way to keep your mind off smoking. This can be as intense or as relaxing as you’d like — walking, jogging or even going up and down a set of stairs. Getting up and moving will help boost your energy and beat that craving.

    Another technique for coping with smoking cravings is to take slow and deep breaths where you inhale through the nose and exhale through the mouth. Repeat this ten times to help yourself feel relaxed.

    These helpful tricks along with the use of nicotine replacements can help you push through a craving. Try a nicotine lozenge or nicotine gum for discreet and convenient support. 

  • Now that you’ve given up smoking, you’re probably thinking about how to replace your smoking rituals.

    You don’t need to light up to maintain the social and physical aspects of your everyday smoking rituals. If you go out for a cigarette at certain times of the day, like after having food, while chatting with a friend, or having an alcoholic drink — go outside and do something else. Go to the park, call a friend, or find the parts of your daily smoking rituals that you like that don’t involve smoking.

    A little bit of exercise is also great for replacing your smoking rituals. Anything from hitting the gym to doing a little garden can help you reduce stress and even help you shave a few pounds.

    Used to having one final cigarette before going to bed? Find a new favourite way to wind down. Try watching a few minutes of comedy, reading a book, practicing muscle relaxation techniques or relieving stress with mental exercises.

  • Slip-ups happen. The good news is you can bounce back. Especially if you look at them as an opportunity to learn, instead of letting them discourage you. 

    A slip up can help you identify your smoking triggers so next time you’ll be better prepared around situations that cause them.

    Smoking triggers can be any of the following:

    Emotional triggers such as being anxious, bored, down, lonely or stressed as well as more positive ones like being excited, happy or satisfied.

    Pattern triggers like when drinking alcohol or coffee, driving, finishing a meal, taking a break at work, talking over the phone, watching TV or before going to sleep.

    Social triggers which can include going to a bar, attending a social event or being with friends who smoke.

    Withdrawal triggers such as the craving for the taste of a cigarette, smelling cigarette smoke, holding onto lighters or matches or needing to do something with either your hands or mouth, or both.

    Nicotine replacement therapy can help take the edge off when you’re trying to quit or reduce smoking. Try THRIVE nicotine gums or nicotine lozenges. 

  • Once you take steps to stop smoking, expect nicotine withdrawal symptoms to reach their peak two to three days after you've begun. These symptoms are usually gone within one to three months after you stop.

    Common withdrawal symptoms are:

    An intense craving for nicotine

    Anxiety

    Coughing and a possible sore throat

    Depression

    Finding it hard to concentrate

    Headaches

    Insomnia

    Intestinal cramping

    Irritability

    Nausea

    Sweating

    A tingling feeling in the hands and feet

    Weight gain

    The signs are different for everyone. One way to tell that your addiction is waning is that cigarettes are no longer an option, no matter what. When the things that once triggered you to reach for your pack no longer have power over you, you’ll know you’re winning the battle.

  • To truly understand the road ahead of you when it comes to giving up smoking, it’s important to know just how much nicotine is in a cigarette.

    There can be anywhere from 8 milligrams to 20 milligrams of nicotine found in a single cigarette, with the average amount being 12 milligrams.

    While the amounts vary, one thing that is constant is that your body receives approximately 12 milligrams of nicotine from each cigarette. From here, the following process takes place inside your body:

    The nicotine from cigarettes is absorbed very quickly and goes straight from your lungs, into your bloodstream and to your brain.

    Nicotine will stimulate your brain, where receptors are activated which will release chemicals and provide you with a feeling of pleasure.

    These nicotine receptors will expand in number with prolonged smoking— there could be millions found in the brain of a serious smoker.

    Over time, your brain will become reliant on nicotine as a means of releasing these feel-good chemicals.